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General Education

General education is designed to introduce students to the variety of means through which people comprehend the modern world. General education introduces the content and methodology of the major areas of knowledge. All degree programs include general education requirements.

The general education program provides the opportunity for students to develop:

  • Intellectual skills
  • Information Technology
  • Affective and creative capabilities
  • Critical thinking
  • Positive social attitudes
  • Appreciation for cultural diversity that present effective learners and good citizens

CIAT offers three areas of General Education study. Learn more about each area below.

1

English

2

Social and Behavioral Sciences

3

Scientific and Quantitative Reasoning

English

Course #: ENG-100

Semester Hours: 3 (45 Classroom Hours)

Course Description:

The goal of this course is to prepare students for English Composition. After this course, students should have:

  1. Developed reading, writing, critical thinking and study skills.
  2. An understanding of the writing process: prewriting, drafting, editing, revising.
  3. Developed the ability to write a well-organized, well-developed, and well-edited essay.
  4. Developed the skills needed for the final essay exam.

Prerequisites: There are no prerequisites for this course.

Course #: ENG-101

Semester Hours: 3 (45 Classroom Hours)

Course Description:

Provides a study of and practice in the use of language and writing of argumentative, analytical essays and research papers. Emphasis is on college-level expository essay construction, communication, and research methods. After this course, students should be able to:

  1. Analyze a variety of texts and their rhetorical structures, arguments and themes. Identify main ideas, types of evidence, organizational patterns, rhetorical strategies, and fact vs. opinion. Type of texts include critical, informative, argumentative, analytical and fictional.
  2. Compose clear, well-developed, substantive argumentative and analytical essays, including a research paper.
  3. Ethically apply rhetorical techniques and avoid plagiarism and deception; students must use proper documentation of ideas from others. Demonstrate equitable consideration of ideas and information, including ethical appeals such as Logos, Ethos, and Pathos.
  4. Demonstrate the writing process, which includes 5 stages: reading, brainstorming, outlining, revising, editing.
  5. Evaluate, analyze, and synthesize sources. Evaluate and analyze sources for reliability, credibility, and biases. Integrate sources to support arguments.
  6. Employ the rules and logic of the MLA style of documentation. MLA documentation includes in-text citation (signal phrases, parenthetical citations, quotations, paraphrasing, grammatical synthesis) and work cited pages.
  7. Write grammatically correct and effective sentences. Demonstrate proper syntax, punctuation, and clarity.

Prerequisites: ENG-100 or equivalent prior course.

Course #: ENG-201

Semester Hours: 3 (45 Classroom Hours)

Course Description:

This course will survey various narrative techniques across a broad spectrum of genres, including novels, short stories, graphic novels and comic books, television, and the movies. The student will examine how we tell stories, but also ask the question why narrative is so integral to the human condition. After this course, students should be able to:

  1. Communicate effectively in both speech and writing.
  2. Read, notate, and analyze narrative techniques used in a variety of texts.
  3. Apply critical thinking to the reading of a literary text and discuss the relationship between form and content.
  4. Conduct research using a wide range of college-level resources to find support for analysis and arguments in writing a variety of essays.
  5. Initiate conversations based on observations and reactions to various narrative texts.
  6. Identify when and where a source is required to support an argument. Justify why a citation’s content gives depth and validity to the student’s claims and/or thesis.
  7. Compose various argumentative essays with proper sentence structure, punctuation, grammar, spelling and usage.
  8. Evaluate arguments from both non-fiction and literary sources and write essays that are uninfluenced by emotions or personal prejudices.
  9. Demonstrate an understanding of the responsibilities of an intelligent citizen in a world with diverse cultural views including environmental, global and cultural awareness.
  10. Write an objective, fully supported paper that not only demonstrates the ability to think critically but also supports a challenging thesis.
  11. Assess and accurately follow MLA research guidelines.

Prerequisites: ENG-100 or equivalent prior course.

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Course #: SBS-110

Semester Hours: 3 (45 Classroom Hours)

Course Description:

This course provides an introduction to psychology as the scientific study of mental processes and human behavior. Biological, environmental and social factors which influence human behavior are examined as well as how humans feel, reason, remember, learn and develop. Psychological disorders and therapy methods are introduced.

Covered topics include:

  1. The Science of Psychology
  2. The Biological Perspective
  3. Sensation and Perception
  4. Consciousness: Sleep, Dreams, Hypnosis, and Drugs
  5. Learning
  6. Memories
  7. Cognition
  8. Development Across the Life Span
  9. Motivation and Emotion
  10. Sexuality and Gender
  11. Stress and Health
  12. Social Psychology
  13. Theories of Personality
  14. Psychological Disorders
  15. Psychological Therapies

Prerequisites: There are no prerequisites for this course.

Scientific and Quantitative Reasoning

Course #: MTH-100

Semester Hours: 3 (45 Classroom Hours)

Course Description:

Presents a study of College Algebra and analytic Geometry with an emphasis on mathematical modeling. The student will analyze functions in depth including transformations, inverses and compositions; while paying particular attention to quadratic, polynomial, rational, exponential and logarithmic functions and their graphs. Other topics include complex numbers, the binomial theorem, arithmetic and geometric sequences, series, systems of equations and inequalities, matrices and determinants, partial fractions, algebraic equations and inequalities, conic sections and probability. Upon completion, students will be able to solve real world problems and use appropriate models for analysis. This course is designed to prepare students for Calculus. This course meets Common Core standards as well as the California state requirements.

Covered topics include:

  1. Equations and Inequalities
  2. Functions and Graphs
  3. Polynomial and Rational Functions
  4. Exponential and Logarithmic Functions
  5. Systems of Equations and Inequalities
  6. Matrices and Determinants
  7. Sequence and Series
  8. Conic Sections
  9. Probability

Prerequisites: There are no prerequisites for this course.

Course #: MTH-110

Semester Hours: 3 (45 Classroom Hours)

Course Description:

This course is designed to prepare students in the understanding of properties and applications in Euclidean geometry. Extensive use of definitions, postulates and theorems are used throughout this course to write proofs using deductive reasoning. Critical thinking skills are used in solving real world applications. Topics include parallel and perpendicular lines, congruence, similar and other properties of triangles, introduction to trigonometry, transformations, three dimensional concepts, conics, angles, polygons, circles, area, perimeter, surface area and volume. This course is equivalent to one year of High School Plane Geometry or one semester of college level Geometry. This course meets Common Core standards as well as the California state requirements.

Covered topics include:

  1. Introduction to Geometry, Logic and Proofs
  2. Triangles
  3. Introduction to Trigonometry
  4. Polygons
  5. Circles
  6. Constructions and Transformations
  7. Perimeter of a Plane Figure
  8. Area of a Plane Figure
  9. Surface Area
  10. Volume
  11. Conic Sections

Prerequisites: MTH-100 or equivalent prior course.

Course #: MTH-120

Semester Hours: 3 (45 Classroom Hours)

Course Description:

This course provides a study of the relationships between the angles and sides of triangles, relationships between central angles and coordinate points on a circle, right triangles, circular functions, degree/radian measures of angles, trigonometric functions of angles, inverse functions, identities, graphic representations of trigonometric functions, law of sines and cosines, trigonometric equation, vectors, complex numbers, and polar coordinates. This course is designed to prepare students’ for further study in mathematics required in the sciences and other technical fields. This course meets Common Core standards as well as the California state requirements.

Covered topics include:

  1. The Six trigonometric Functions
  2. Trigonometry
  3. Radian Measure
  4. Graphs of Trigonometric Functions
  5. Trigonometric Identities
  6. Trigonometric Equations
  7. Triangles
  8. Polar Coordinates & Complex Numbers

Prerequisites: MTH-100 or equivalent prior course.

Course #: MTH-150

Semester Hours: 4 (45 Classroom Hours)

Course Description:

This course is primarily designed to emphasize topics which are fundamental to the study of calculus. The student will analyze functions in depth including transformations, inverses and compositions; while paying particular attention to quadratic, polynomial, rational, exponential and logarithmic functions and their graphs. Other topics include right triangle trigonometry, trigonometric identities and equations, vectors, complex numbers, laws of sines and cosines, the binomial theorem, arithmetic and geometric sequences and series, systems, partial fractions, matrices and determinants, conic sections and probability. The student will solve applications and modeling problems related to the above topics. Upon completion, students should be able to solve practical problems and use appropriate models for analysis. This course meets Common Core standards as well as the California state requirements.

Covered topics include:

  1. Functions and their Graphs
  2. Polynomial and Rational Functions
  3. Exponential and Logarithmic Functions
  4. Trigonometric Functions
  5. Radian Measure & Trigonometric Identities
  6. Additional Trigonometry Topics
  7. Systems of Equations
  8. Matrices
  9. Sequence, Series, Counting and Probability
  10. Conic Sections

Prerequisites: MTH-100 or equivalent prior course.

Course #: MTH-161

Semester Hours: 4 (45 Classroom Hours)

Course Description:

Presents a study of analytic geometry, limits, continuity, the calculus of algebraic, trigonometric, exponential and logarithmic functions as well as applications of the derivative and integral. Each topic is taught geometrically, numerically, and algebraically. The course explores mathematical concepts, methods and applications from life issues, science, business, finance and environmental issues.

Covered topics include:

  1. Functions
  2. Limits and Continuity
  3. Differentiation
  4. Applications of Derivatives
  5. Integration

Prerequisites: MTH-150 or equivalent prior course.

Course #:MTH-162

Semester Hours: 4 (45 Classroom Hours)

Course Description:

Presents a continuing study of integration techniques, applications to physics and engineering, improper integrals, transcendental functions, first order differential equations, series and sequences, parametric equations and polar coordinates. Each topic is taught geometrically, numerically, and algebraically.

Covered topics include:

  1. Integration
  2. Applications of Definite Integrals
  3. Transcendental Functions
  4. Techniques of Integration
  5. First Order Differential Equations
  6. Infinite Series and Sequences
  7. Parametric Equations and Polar Coordinates

Prerequisites: MTH-161 or equivalent prior course.

Course #: MTH-163

Semester Hours: 4 (45 Classroom Hours)

Course Description:

Presents a study of differentiation and integration of functions of several variables, parametric curves and surfaces, and the calculus of vector fields. Topics are inclusive of, but not limited to, multivariable vector functions, partial derivatives, directional derivatives, surfaces and hyper surfaces, parametric equations, multiple integrals using several different coordinate systems, line integrals, Green’s Theorem, the Divergence Theorem and Stokes Theorem.

Covered topics include:

  1. Vectors and The Geometry of Space
  2. Vector-Valued Functions and Motion in Space
  3. Partial Derivatives
  4. Multiple Integrals
  5. Integration in Vector Fields
  6. Second-Order Differential Equations

Prerequisites: MTH-162 or equivalent prior course.

Course #: SCI-120

Semester Hours: 3 (45 Classroom Hours)

Course Description:

An introduction to the major concepts of biology with emphasis on its relevance to current problems in the world. The course stresses the scientific process, genetics, heredity, cellular structure, cellular chemistry, evolution, reproduction, ecology, behavior, and diversity of plants and animals.

Covered topics include:

  1. Biology Today
  2. Genetics
  3. Evolution and Diversity
  4. Ecology & Plant Structure

Prerequisites: There are no prerequisites for this course.

Course #: SCI-130

Semester Hours: 3 (45 Classroom Hours)

Course Description:

Presents an introduction to chemistry and chemical laboratory techniques covering the basic principles and applications of chemistry. This course is designed for general education purposes and for students in programs that require a chemistry background. Topics include metric and English conversions, atomic theory, solution preparation and their properties, chemical reactions, inorganic chemical nomenclature, bonding, periodic table, mass relationships and acid/base theory.

Covered topics include:

  1. What is Chemistry?
  2. The Numerical Side of Chemistry
  3. The Evolution of Atomic Theory
  4. The Modern Model of the Atom
  5. Chemical Bonding and Nomenclature
  6. The Shape of Molecules
  7. Intermolecular Forces and the Phases of Matter
  8. Chemical Reactions
  9. Stoichiometry and the Mole
  10. Electron Transfer in Chemical Reactions
  11. What If There Were No Intermolecular Forces? The Ideal Gas
  12. Solutions
  13. When Reactants Turn into Products
  14. Chemical Equilibrium
  15. Electrolytes, Acids, and Bases
  16. Nuclear Chemistry
  17. The Chemistry of Carbon
  18. Synthetic and Biological Polymers

Prerequisites: There are no prerequisites for this course.

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